Table of Contents
Conference Papers in Science
Volume 2014, Article ID 347979, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/347979
Conference Paper

Oxidation State of a Polyurethane Membrane after Plasma Etching

1Division of Electrical Systems and Optics, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
2Division of Materials, Mechanics and Structures, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK

Received 22 November 2013; Accepted 24 February 2014; Published 8 April 2014

Academic Editors: A. Baykal and J. Gough

This Conference Paper is based on a presentation given by Matthew D. Moles at “UK Society for Biomaterials Annual Conference 2013” held from 24 June 2013 to 25 June 2013 in Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Copyright © 2014 Matthew D. Moles et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Low moduli cell culture substrates can be used to apply dynamic mechanical strain to cells, by surface deformation. Understanding the surface interaction with cells is critical to improving cell adhesion and normal growth. A medical grade polyurethane (PU), Chronoflex AL 80A, was modified by oxygen plasma etching and characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Etching resulted in increased cross-linking at the isocyanate bond and formation of new oxygen moieties. The model, derived from patent data and XPS data of the unetched PU, indicated that the additional oxygen was likely to be hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. Etched membranes enhanced protein adhesion, resulting in full surface coverage compared to unetched PU. The etched PU supported cell adhesion and spreading, while the unetched PU was not conducive to monolayer formation.