Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 409562, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/409562
Hypothesis

Chromatin from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells as Biomarkers for Epigenetic Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

1The Psychiatric Institute, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1601 W. Taylor St., Chicago, IL 60612, USA
2Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, 912 S. Wood St., Chicago, IL 60612, USA

Received 15 April 2009; Accepted 1 June 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 David P. Gavin and Rajiv P. Sharma. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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