Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 475108, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/475108
Hypothesis

Serotonin 5- H T 2 A Receptor Function as a Contributing Factor to Both Neuropsychiatric and Cardiovascular Diseases

Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA

Received 1 June 2009; Revised 7 August 2009; Accepted 14 August 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 Charles D. Nichols. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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