Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2009, Article ID 969752, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/969752
Hypothesis

Possible Treatment Concepts for the Levodopa-Related Hyperhomocysteinemia

Department of Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital Berlin-Weissensee, Gartenstr. 1, 13088 Berlin, Germany

Received 26 April 2009; Revised 13 June 2009; Accepted 16 July 2009

Academic Editor: Hari Manev

Copyright © 2009 Thomas Müller. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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