Table of Contents
Cardiovascular Psychiatry and Neurology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 106123, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/106123
Research Article

S100b Counteracts Neurodegeneration of Rat Cholinergic Neurons in Brain Slices after Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation

1Laboratory of Psychiatry and Exp. Alzheimer's Research, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstraβe 35, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
2C. E. Schmidt College of Biomedical Science, Florida Atlantic University (FAU), Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA

Received 28 January 2010; Revised 2 March 2010; Accepted 4 March 2010

Academic Editor: Rosario Donato

Copyright © 2010 Daniela Serbinek et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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