Table of Contents
Chromatography Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 732409, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/732409
Research Article

A Simple Densitometric Method for the Quantification of Inhibitory Neurotransmitter Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) in Rat Brain Tissue

1Centre for Toxicology and Developmental Research, Sri Ramachandra University, Chennai, TN-600 116, India
2PSG College of Pharmacy, Post Box No 1674, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, TN 641 004, India

Received 4 July 2010; Accepted 16 December 2010

Academic Editor: Teresa Kowalska

Copyright © 2011 Chidambaram Saravana Babu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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