Table of Contents
Chromatography Research International
Volume 2011, Article ID 815183, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/815183
Research Article

Determination of Glucosamine in Human Plasma by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Source-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Central South University, 410013 Changsha, China
2Bioanalytical Laboratory, Hunan Tiger-Xiangya R.&D. Company Ltd., 410013 Changsha, China

Received 22 March 2011; Revised 13 April 2011; Accepted 13 April 2011

Academic Editor: Irene Panderi

Copyright © 2011 Xingchen Zhou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

A sensitive, specific, and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-APCI-MS/MS) method for the determination of glucosamine in human plasma was developed and validated. Plasma samples were processed by protein precipitation with dehydrated ethanol, and the chromatographic separation was performed on an Agilent XDB-C18 column with a mobile phase of methanol—0.2% formic acid solution (70 : 30, v/v). Mass spectrometric quantification was carried out in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode, monitoring ion transitions of m/z 180.1 to m/z 162.1 with collision energy (CE) of 2 eV for glucosamine and m/z 181.1 to m/z 163.1 with CE of 2 eV for the internal standard (IS) in positive ion mode. The linear calibration curves covered a concentration range of 53.27–3409 ng/mL with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) of 53.27 ng/mL. The extraction recovery of glucosamine was greater than 101.7%. The intra- and interday precisions for glucosamine were less than 10%, and the accuracies were between 93.7% and 102.6%, determined from quality control (QC) samples of three representative concentrations. The method has been successfully applied to determining the plasma concentration of glucosamine in a clinical pharmacokinetic study involving 20 healthy Chinese male volunteers.