Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Anesthesiology
Volume 2011, Article ID 379827, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/379827
Case Report

The Sheared Central Venous Catheter?

1Department of Anaesthesiology, SDM College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Dharwad, Karnataka 580009, India
2Department of Radiodiagnosis, SDM College of Medical Sciences and Hospital, Dharwad, Karnataka 580009, India

Received 1 August 2011; Accepted 29 August 2011

Academic Editor: J. Yang

Copyright © 2011 Harihar V. Hegde et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. K. Knutstad, B. Hager, and M. Hauser, “Radiologic diagnosis and management of complications related to central venous access,” Acta Radiologica, vol. 44, no. 5, pp. 508–516, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. H. V. Hegde, R. Sachidananda, R. P. Rao, and S. S. Deshapande, “Communication between two channels of central venous catheter: a rare manufacturing defect,” Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 109, no. 6, pp. 2032–2033, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at PubMed · View at Scopus
  3. R. E. Vandoni, A. Guerra, P. Sanna, M. Bogen, F. Cavalli, and P. Gertsch, “Randomised comparison of complications from three different permanent central venous access systems,” Swiss Medical Weekly, vol. 139, no. 21-22, pp. 313–316, 2009. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. M. Mercuri, M. Distefano, M. Crovaro et al., “Central venous catheter disruption and embolization: percutaneous retrieval. A case report,” European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences, vol. 4, no. 5-6, pp. 133–138, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. S. Mahadeva, A. Cohen, and M. Bellamy, “The stuck central venous catheter: beware of potential hazards,” British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 650–652, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. D. H. Hinke, D. A. Zandt-Stastny, L. R. Gooodman, E. J. Quebbeman, E. A. Krzywda, and D. A. Andris, “Pinch-off syndrome: a complication of implantable subclavian venous access devices,” Radiology, vol. 177, no. 2, pp. 353–356, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. G. Gladman, S. Sinha, D. G. Sims, and M. L. Chiswick, “Staphylococcus epidermidis and retention of neonatal percutaneous central venous catheters,” Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 234–235, 1990. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. P. K. Ng, M. J. Ault, and M. C. Fishbein, “The stuck catheter: a case report,” Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, vol. 64, no. 4-5, pp. 350–352, 1997. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. B. Bessoud, T. De Baere, V. Kuoch et al., “Experience at a single institution with endovascular treatment of mechanical complications caused by implanted central venous access devices in pediatric and adult patients,” American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 180, no. 2, pp. 527–532, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus