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Case Reports in Anesthesiology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 321054, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/321054
Case Report

Application of Dual Mask for Postoperative Respiratory Support in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patient

1VA Western New York Healthcare System, Division of Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, VA Medical Center, Room 203C, 3495 Bailey Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14215, USA
2University of Iowa, Mason City Cardiology, Mason City, IA 50401, USA
3VA Western New York Healthcare System, Division of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY 14215, USA
4Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, NY 14215, USA
5Director of Mercy North-Iowa Neurology and Sleep Laboratory, University of Iowa, Mason City Neurology, Mason City, IA 50401, USA

Received 26 February 2013; Accepted 25 March 2013

Academic Editors: U. Buyukkocak, M. Dauri, I.-O. Lee, R. Riley, and E. A. Vandermeersch

Copyright © 2013 Jahan Porhomayon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In some conditions continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) therapy alone fails to provide satisfactory oxygenation. In these situations oxygen (O2) is often being added to CPAP/BIPAP mask or hose. Central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often present along with other chronic conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure, pulmonary fibrosis, neuromuscular disorders, chronic narcotic use, or central hypoventilation syndrome. Any of these conditions may lead to the need for supplemental O2 administration during the titration process. Maximization of comfort, by delivering O2 directly via a nasal cannula through the mask, will provide better oxygenation and ultimately treat the patient with lower CPAP/BIPAP pressure.