Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Anesthesiology
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3210473, 5 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3210473
Case Report

In-Flight Hypoxemia in a Tracheostomy-Dependent Infant

Department of Anesthesiology, Educational Affairs, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 2301 VUH, Nashville, TN 37232-7237, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Jason Quevreaux; ude.tlibrednav@xuaerveuq.m.nosaj

Received 16 November 2016; Revised 14 January 2017; Accepted 16 February 2017; Published 28 February 2017

Academic Editor: Richard Riley

Copyright © 2017 Jason Quevreaux and Christopher Cropsey. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. 2015 U.S.-Based Airline Traffic Data | Bureau of Transportation Statistics, http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/press_releases/bts018_16.
  2. D. C. Peterson, C. Martin-Gill, F. X. Guyette et al., “Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights,” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 368, no. 22, pp. 2075–2083, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. C. Thibeault, A. D. Evans, and N. P. Dowdall, “AsMA medical guidelines for air travel: fitness to fly and medical clearances,” Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, vol. 86, no. 7, p. 656, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. Federal Aviation Administration, “Pressurized Cabins. Federal Aviation Regulations Title 14 Part 25 Section 841,” Federal Aviation Administration.
  5. R. A. McFarland, “Human factors in relation to the development of pressurized cabins,” Aerospace Medicine, vol. 42, no. 12, pp. 1303–1318, 1971. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. N. B. Hampson, D. A. Kregenow, A. M. Mahoney et al., “Altitude exposures during commercial flight: a reappraisal,” Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 27–31, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. P. T. Kelly, L. M. Seccombe, P. G. Rogers, and M. J. Peters, “Directly measured cabin pressure conditions during Boeing 747-400 commercial aircraft flights,” Respirology, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 511–515, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. T. A. Dillard, B. W. Berg, K. R. Rajagopal, J. W. Dooley, and W. J. Mehm, “Hypoxemia during air travel in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,” Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 111, no. 5, pp. 362–367, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. J. M. Muhm, P. B. Rock, D. L. McMullin et al., “Effect of aircraft-cabin altitude on passenger discomfort,” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 357, no. 1, pp. 18–27, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. W. D. Toff, C. I. Jones, I. Ford et al., “Effect of hypobaric hypoxia, simulating conditions during long-haul air travel, on coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet function, and endothelial activation,” Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 295, no. 19, pp. 2251–2261, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. E. Spoorenberg, M. H. A. H. van den Oord, T. Meeuwsen, and T. Takken, “Fitness to fly testing in patients with congenital heart and lung disease,” Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, vol. 87, no. 1, pp. 54–60, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. T. T. Nicholson and J. I. Sznajder, “Fitness to fly in patients with lung disease,” Annals of the American Thoracic Society, vol. 11, no. 10, pp. 1614–1622, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. A. M. Luks, “Do lung disease patients need supplemental oxygen at high altitude?” High Altitude Medicine and Biology, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 321–327, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. T. Goto, M. Sato, A. Yamazaki et al., “The effect of atmospheric pressure on ventricular assist device output,” Journal of Artificial Organs, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 104–108, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. Aerospace Medical Association, Aviation Safety Committee, and Civil Aviation Subcommittee, “Cabin cruising altitudes for regular transport aircraft,” Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 79, no. 4, pp. 433–439, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  16. J. P. Brown and M. P. Grocott, “Humans at altitude: physiology and pathophysiology,” Continuing Education in Anaesthesia, Critical Care & Pain, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 17–22, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. S. Huez, V. Faoro, H. Guénard, J.-B. Martinot, and R. Naeije, “Echocardiographic and tissue doppler imaging of cardiac adaptation to high altitude in native highlanders versus acclimatized lowlanders,” American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 103, no. 11, pp. 1605–1609, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. M. Luks and E. R. Swenson, “Travel to high altitude with pre-existing lung disease,” European Respiratory Journal, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 770–792, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. J. P. Higgins, T. Tuttle, and J. A. Higgins, “Altitude and the heart: is going high safe for your cardiac patient?” American Heart Journal, vol. 159, no. 1, pp. 25–32, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. Federal Aviation Administration, First-Aid Kits and Emergency Medical Kits. Federal Aviation Regulations Title 14 Part 121 Appendix-A, Federal Aviation Administration, 2012.
  21. Federal Aviation Administration, Advisory Circular: Emergency Medical Equipment Training. AC No. 121-34B, Federal Aviation Administration, Washington, DC, USA, 2006.
  22. S. M. Badawy, A. A. Thompson, and M. Sand, “In-flight emergencies: medical kits are not good enough for kids,” Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 363–365, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. M. A. Gendreau and C. Dejohn, “Responding to medical events during commercial airline flights,” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 346, no. 14, pp. 1067–1073, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. International Air Transport Association (IATA), Medical Manual Montreal, IATA, 2006.
  25. T. Bashir, “Patients crash more than airlines: a medical emergency at 35,000 ft,” Journal of Community Hospital Internal Medicine Perspectives, vol. 4, no. 3, Article ID 24730, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  26. K. Williams, “Doctors as good samaritans: some empirical evidence concerning emergency medical treatment in Britain,” Journal of Law and Society, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 258–282, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. L. A. DiMaggio, S. E. Rubino, and R. V. Lee, “Good samaritans or reticent bystanders?” Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 143–146, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  28. R. J. Gray and G. S. Sharpe, “Doctors, Samaritans and the accident victim,” 1972, http://wbldb.lievers.net/10104908.html.
  29. C. P. Gross, A. B. Reisman, and M. D. Schwartz, “The physician as ambivalent samaritan: will internists resuscitate victims of out-of-hospital emergencies?” Journal of General Internal Medicine, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 491–494, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. W. M. Garneau, D. M. Harris, and A. J. Viera, “Cross-sectional survey of Good Samaritan behaviour by physicians in North Carolina,” BMJ Open, vol. 6, no. 3, Article ID e010720, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. “Aviation Medical Assistance Act of 1998, Pub. L. No. 105–170,” Washington, DC, USA: National Archives and Records Administration.
  32. A. Chandra and S. Conry, “In-flight medical emergencies,” Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 499–504, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. Aerospace Medical Association, Medical Emergencies: Managing In-Flight Medical Events (Guidance Material for Health Professionals), Aerospace Medical Association, 2016.
  34. J. Orsborn, J. Graham, M. Moss, M. Melguizo, T. Nick, and M. Stroud, “Pediatric endotracheal tube cuff pressures during aeromedical transport,” Pediatric Emergency Care, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 20–22, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. J. Henning, P. Sharley, and R. Young, “Pressures within air-filled tracheal cuffs at altitude—an in vivo study,” Anaesthesia, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 252–254, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. C. Mann, N. Parkinson, and A. Bleetman, “Endotracheal tube and laryngeal mask airway cuff volume changes with altitude: a rule of thumb for aeromedical transport,” Emergency Medicine Journal, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 165–167, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. T. Britton, T. C. Blakeman, J. Eggert, D. Rodriquez, H. Ortiz, and R. D. Branson, “Managing endotracheal tube cuff pressure at altitude: a comparison of four methods,” Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. S240–S244, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. P. Brendt, M. Schnekenburger, K. Paxton, A. Brown, and K. Mendis, “Endotracheal tube cuff pressure before, during, and after fixed-wing air medical retrieval,” Prehospital Emergency Care, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 177–180, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus