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Case Reports in Cardiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6283581, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6283581
Case Report

18F-FDG-PET Scanning Confirmed Infected Intracardiac Device-Leads with Abiotrophia defectiva

1Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonessenhuis, 3582 KE Utrecht, Netherlands
2Department of Cardiology, Diakonessenhuis, 3582 KE Utrecht, Netherlands
3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Diakonessenhuis, 3582 KE Utrecht, Netherlands
4Department of Microbiology, Diakonessenhuis, 3582 KE Utrecht, Netherlands

Received 3 November 2015; Accepted 16 March 2016

Academic Editor: Antonio de Padua Mansur

Copyright © 2016 Sonja van Roeden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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