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Case Reports in Critical Care
Volume 2017, Article ID 8724810, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8724810
Case Report

Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency: If at First You Do Not Diagnose, Try and Try Again

1Department of Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA
2Department of Nutritional Services, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA
3Department of Clinical Genomics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA
4Division of Hospital Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Nicole E. Joyce; ude.oyam@1elociN.ecyoJ

Received 5 August 2017; Revised 21 October 2017; Accepted 6 November 2017; Published 27 November 2017

Academic Editor: Kurt Lenz

Copyright © 2017 Christan D. Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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