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Case Reports in Dentistry
Volume 2014, Article ID 171657, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/171657
Case Report

High-Wattage Pulsed Irradiation of Linearly Polarized Near-Infrared Light to Stellate Ganglion Area for Burning Mouth Syndrome

1Department of Oral Medicine, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate Faculty of Dentistry, Kuramoto 3-18-15, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan
2Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate Faculty of Dentistry, Kuramoto 3-18-15, Tokushima 770-8504, Japan

Received 24 August 2014; Accepted 6 October 2014; Published 19 October 2014

Academic Editor: Vlaho Brailo

Copyright © 2014 Yukihiro Momota et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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