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Case Reports in Dermatological Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4305910, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4305910
Case Report

Evolution of Skin during Rehabilitation for Elephantiasis Using Intensive Treatment

1Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiabá, MT, Brazil
2Research Group of the Clínica Godoy, São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
3Postgraduation Course of the Medicine School in São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP) and Research Group of the Clínica Godoy, São Jose do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil
4Research Group of Godoy Clinic, Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery Department of the Medicine School in São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP), São José do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 29 July 2016; Revised 19 September 2016; Accepted 28 September 2016

Academic Editor: Alireza Firooz

Copyright © 2016 Henrique Jose Pereira de Godoy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The objective of this study is to describe the evolution of the skin during rehabilitation for elephantiasis using intensive treatment. We report on the case of a 55-year-old patient with a seven-year history of leg edema. The patient reported that it began with repeated outbreaks of erysipelas over several years. One leg evolved with significant edema leading to an inability to ambulate and for about one month the patient said that he could not get out of bed. Moreover the patient was obese weighing 130 kilos and with a BMI of 39. Intensive treatment was performed over three weeks resulting in a significant reduction in limb volume. The treatment consisted of Mechanical Lymphatic Therapy (RAGodoy), Cervical Lymphatic Stimulation (Godoy & Godoy technique), and a custom-made inelastic stocking of a grosgrain textile. What caught the attention during therapy were the open wounds resulting from fragmentation of the plaque as the edema reduced; the plaque was about 0.5 cm thick. As the treatment evolved the plaque disappeared and the wounds healed. The limb size decreased by more than 80% in three weeks after which the patient began to be treated in an outpatient setting with ambulation using a grosgrain stocking.