Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Endocrinology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 379852, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379852
Case Report

Incidental Lipid Poor Adrenal Mass in a Patient with Antiphospholipid Syndrome

1Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue Desk F20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue Desk F20, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA

Received 30 November 2012; Accepted 18 January 2013

Academic Editors: C. Capella, K. Iida, and A. Sahdev

Copyright © 2013 Subramanian Kannan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Adrenal incidentalomas are commonly encountered in this era of ubiquitous imaging. The attenuation of the incidentaloma measured in Hounsfield units (HU) is an important step in the work up. Attenuation less than 10 HU indicates a benign lesion in more than 98% of cases, whereas attenuation greater than 30 HU is highly suspicious for adrenocortical cancer (ACC). Adrenal hematoma is rarely suspected clinically and exhibits no specific clinical symptoms or laboratory findings. There are multiple radiological features of adrenal hemorrhage and can mimic ACC. We present a case of an adrenal mass in a patient with antiphospholipid syndrome and discuss radiological clues to differentiate adrenal hematomas from ACC and thus avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.