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Case Reports in Endocrinology
Volume 2016, Article ID 2017571, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2017571
Case Report

A Case of Glucocorticoid Remediable Aldosteronism and Thoracoabdominal Aneurysms

1Department of Internal Medicine, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, 836 West Wellington Avenue, Chicago, IL 60657, USA
2Department of Radiology, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, 836 West Wellington Avenue, Chicago, IL 60657, USA

Received 10 March 2016; Accepted 15 May 2016

Academic Editor: John Broom

Copyright © 2016 Anahita Shahrrava et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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