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Letter to the Editor
Case Report
  • Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: An Unwelcome Thrill, Matthew K. Edwards, Erica N. Christenson, Brian M. Corliss, Adam J. Polifka, and Brandon R. Allen
    Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
    Case Report (3 pages), Article ID 8386459, Volume 2017 (2017)
    Published 5 April 2017
Case Reports in Emergency Medicine
Volume 2018, Article ID 7514784, 1 page
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/7514784
Corrigendum

Corrigendum to “Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: An Unwelcome Thrill”

1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Florida Health, Gainesville, FL, USA
2Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida Health, Gainesville, FL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Brandon R. Allen; ude.lfu@nellarnodnarb

Received 12 July 2018; Accepted 18 July 2018; Published 9 August 2018

Copyright © 2018 Matthew K. Edwards et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


In the article titled “Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: An Unwelcome Thrill” [1], there was an editorial error, which was indicated in the Letter to the Editor by Foreman et al. [2]. The authors apologize for mistakenly including the case report by Foreman et al. [3] as an example of vertebral AV fistulae potentially induced by chiropractic manipulation. As they correctly observed, the intracranial location of their patient’s AV fistula argues against this etiology. Instead, the authors intended to cite Briganti et al. who reported on a patient with an extradural AV fistula that formed after spinal manipulation [4].

The authors originally included the publication by Foreman et al. in their discussion on AV fistulas not associated with chiropractic manipulation, which was later removed during editing. Although there are many studies on patients suffering vertebrobasilar stroke and arterial dissection following chiropractic neck manipulation, temporal association does not necessarily equate causation. The authors praise Foreman et al. for their case report, which illustrates the danger of etiological assumption and thank them for drawing attention to the need for more rigorous investigation into causes of AV fistula formation.

References

  1. M. K. Edwards, E. N. Christenson, B. M. Corliss, A. J. Polifka, and B. R. Allen, “Vertebral arteriovenous fistula: an unwelcome thrill,” Case Reports in Emergency Medicine, vol. 2017, Article ID 8386459, 3 pages, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. S. M. Foreman and M. J. Stahl, “Comment on “Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula: An Unwelcome Thrill",” Case Reports in Emergency Medicine, vol. 2018, Article ID 4509435, 1 page, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  3. S. M. Foreman, M. J. Stahl, and G. D. Schultz, “Paraplegia in a chiropractic patient secondary to atraumatic duralarteriovenous fistula with perimedullary hypertension: case report,” Chiropractic and Manual Therapies, vol. 21, no. 1, article 23, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. F. Briganti, E. Tedeschi, G. Leone et al., “Endovascular treatment of vertebro-vertebral arteriovenousfistula: a report of three cases and literature review,” The Neuroradiology Journal, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 339–346, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar