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Case Reports in Genetics
Volume 2014, Article ID 517091, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/517091
Case Report

Atypical Association of Angelman Syndrome and Klinefelter Syndrome in a Boy with 47,XXY Karyotype and Deletion 15q11.2-q13

1Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBIS), University Hospital Virgen del Rocío/CSIC/University of Seville, 41013 Seville, Spain
2Centre of Biomedical Network Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), 41013 Seville, Spain
3Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013 Seville, Spain
4Department of Neurophysiology, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, 41013 Seville, Spain

Received 18 July 2014; Accepted 30 September 2014; Published 14 October 2014

Academic Editor: Jose Luis Royo

Copyright © 2014 Javier Sánchez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Angelman syndrome (AS, OMIM 105830) is a neurogenetic disorder with firm clinical diagnostic guidelines, characterized by severe developmental delay and speech impairment, balanced and behavioral disturbance as well as microcephaly, seizures, and a characteristic electroencephalogram (EEG). The majority of AS cases (70%) are caused by a 15q11.2-q13 deletion on the maternally derived chromosome. The frequency of AS has been estimated to be between 1/10000 and 1/20000. Klinefelter syndrome (KS) occurs due to the presence of an extra X chromosome (karyotype 47,XXY). The main features in KS are small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, gynecomastia, learning difficulties, and infertility. We present what is, to our knowledge, the first case of a patient with both KS and AS due to a 15q11.2-q13 deletion on the maternally derived chromosome and an extra X chromosome of paternal origin. He showed dysmorphic features, axial hypotonia, and delayed acquisition of motor skills. Early diagnosis is essential for optimal treatment of AS children; this is one of the earliest diagnosed cases of AS probably due to the presence of two syndromes. Clinical findings in this patient here described may be helpful to identify any other cases and to evaluate recurrence risks in these families.