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Case Reports in Gastrointestinal Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 8905372, 3 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8905372
Case Report

Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark

Correspondence should be addressed to Jacob Juel; kd.tenldad@leuj.bocaj

Received 10 May 2017; Revised 16 August 2017; Accepted 6 September 2017; Published 4 October 2017

Academic Editor: Shiro Kikuchi

Copyright © 2017 Jacob Juel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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