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Case Reports in Hematology
Volume 2013, Article ID 516705, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/516705
Case Report

Patent Foramen Ovale in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and Stroke: Case Presentations and Review of the Literature

1Hematology Division, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
2Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
4Neurology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
5Cardiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
6Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
7Institute for Cellular Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 26 May 2013

Academic Editors: G. Feher, M. Singh, and S. D. Wagner

Copyright © 2013 Sheila Razdan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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