Case Reports in Immunology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.230
Impact Factor-

Immunotherapy in Metastatic Mucosal Melanoma with Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation: A Case of Success

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Case Reports in Immunology publishes case reports and case series related to allergies, immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, immune disorders, cancer immunology and transplantation immunology.

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Case Reports in Immunology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Very Elevated IgE, Atopy, and Severe Infection: A Genomics-Based Diagnostic Approach to a Spectrum of Diseases

Elevated IgE has been long recognized as an important clinical marker of atopy but can be seen in a myriad of conditions. The discovery of autosomal dominant STAT3 deficiency marked the first recognition of hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) and the first primary immunodeficiency linked to elevated IgE. Since then, genomic testing has increased the number of defects with associated mutations causing hyper-IgE syndrome and atopic diseases with FLG, DOCK8, SPINK5, and CARD11, among others. A spectrum of recurrent infections and atopy are hallmarks of elevated IgE with significant phenotypic overlap between each underlying condition. As treatment is predicated on early diagnosis, genomic testing is becoming a more commonly used diagnostic tool. We present a 6-year-old male patient with markedly elevated IgE and severe atopic dermatitis presenting with staphylococcal bacteremia found to have a heterozygous variant in FLG (p.S3247X) and multiple variants of unknown significance in BCL11B, ZAP70, LYST, and PTPRC. We review the genetic defects underpinning elevated IgE and highlight the spectrum of atopy and immunodeficiency seen in patients with underlying mutations. Although no one mutation is completely causative of the constellation of symptoms in this patient, we suggest the synergism of these variants is an impetus of disease.

Case Report

Hyper IgG4-Related Disease Presenting with Orbital Tumor and Immune Deficiency

We report a case of IgG4-RD in a patient with high IgG4 levels, low functional antibodies, and low IgM levels. He presented with bilateral orbital pseudotumors and, after initial improvement on corticosteroids, relapsed with recurrent pleural effusion and pelvic pseudotumor. He had a grossly elevated serum IgG (1905 mg/dl) with elevations in all IgG subclasses but marked elevation in IgG4 (412 mg/dl), low IgM, and low pneumococcal antibodies. Orbital mass biopsy showed polyclonal lymphocytic infiltration and increased IgG4 plasma cells. The patient was started on prednisone and tried several immunosuppressive medications including mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine with decrease in size of the orbital pseudotumor. During a period when the patient stopped his medications, the pseudotumor enlarged with new development of recurrent pleural effusions. He was also found to have a pelvic mass that was biopsy positive for IgG4 proliferation. This case with progression to multiorgan involvement highlights the importance of identifying patients with IgG4-related disease. In contrast to previous cases with normal-to-high IgM, the IgM was low with impaired functional antibodies.

Case Report

A Novel Mutation in the VPS13B Gene in a Cohen Syndrome Patient with Positive Antiphospholipid Antibodies

Cohen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder with the primary symptoms of mental deficiency, progressive retinopathy, hypotonia, microcephaly, obesity of midchildhood onset, intermittent neutropenia, and dysmorphic facial features. The syndrome has high phenotypic heterogeneity and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the VPS13B gene. Here, we introduce a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.8698G > T, p.E2900X) in the VPS13B gene in an 11-year-old Iranian boy with major symptoms of Cohen syndrome. He also had mild anemia accompanied by positive antiphospholipid antibodies, the latter has never been previously reported in Cohen syndrome.

Case Report

Identification of a New Variant in NLRP3 Gene by Whole Exome Sequencing in a Patient with Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndrome

Background. NLRP3 gene is located in chromosome 1 and encodes a pyrin-like protein. Mutations in this gene are associated with an autoinflammatory disease, called cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS). Case Presentation. We report a 1-year-old boy who had recurrent urticarial rash since birth and joint pain and swelling. He had a missense mutation c.G1060 T (p.A354S) in exon 5 of the NLRP3 gene which was detected by whole exome sequencing. Conclusion. A novel variant was found in the NLRP3 gene which has not been reported by now.

Case Report

Gastric Adenocarcinoma in the Setting of IPEX Syndrome

Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder caused by a loss of function mutation in the FOXP3 gene. It manifests early in infancy with clinical symptoms including autoimmune enteropathy, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and eczema. While aberrant FOXP3 expression has been associated with several types of cancer, little is known regarding the risk of cancer in patients with IPEX harboring the characteristic FOXP3 mutation. Here, we present a unique case of a primary signet ring gastric adenocarcinoma in a pediatric patient with IPEX syndrome.

Case Report

Novel ZAP-70-Related Immunodeficiency Presenting with Epstein–Barr Virus Lymphoproliferative Disorder and Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 (ZAP-70) plays an integral role in the T-cell antigenic receptor complex. A deficiency of this kinase leads to a phenotype of severe combined immunodeficiency, while hypomorphic mutations of the kinase lead to more mild immunodeficiency phenotypes. We present a case of a 21-year-old patient with lymphadenopathy who was found to have Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) and the development of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). On further workup, the patient was ultimately found to have a homozygous intrionic mutation in ZAP-70. This is a novel ZAP-70 mutation (c.1623 + 5G > A) associated with combined immunodeficiency and an EBV-positive LPD. A primary immunodeficiency is important to consider in a young, otherwise healthy patient presenting with an EBV-positive LPD.

Case Reports in Immunology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator0.230
Impact Factor-
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