Case Reports in Immunology
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Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
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Impact Factor-

Fish Tank Granuloma Presenting as a Nasal Cavity Mass

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Case Reports in Immunology publishes case reports and case series related to allergies, immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, immune disorders, cancer immunology and transplantation immunology.

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Case Report

Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder due to a Novel Mutation in Recombination Activation Gene 2: About 2 Cases

Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) comprises a heterogeneous group of inherited immunologic disorders with profound defects in cellular and humoral immunity. SCID is the most severe PID and constitutes a pediatric emergency. Affected children are highly susceptible to bacterial, viral, fungal, and opportunistic infections with life-threatening in the absence of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We report here two cases of SCID. The first case is a girl diagnosed with SCID at birth based on her family history and lymphocyte subpopulation typing. The second case is a 4-month-old boy with a history of recurrent opportunistic infections, BCGitis, and failure to thrive, and the immunology workup confirms a SCID phenotype. The genetic study in the two cases revealed a novel mutation in the RAG2 gene, c.826G > A (p.Gly276Ser), in a homozygous state. The novel mutation in the RAG2 gene identified in our study may help the early diagnosis of SCID.

Case Report

Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease: The First Case of a Diagnosed Adult Patient in the Czech Republic

We present a case of a 42-year-old woman with Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease. The disease was diagnosed at an adult age with relatively typical clinical manifestations; the skeleton, joints, and soft tissues were affected by nontuberculous mycobacteria: Mycobacterium lentiflavum, M. kansasii, and M. avium. A previously published loss-of-function and functionally validated variant NM_000416.2:c.819_822delTAAT in IFNGR1 in a heterozygous state was detected using whole-exome sequencing. After interferon-γ therapy was started at a dose of 200 µg/m2 three times a week, there was significant clinical improvement, with the need to continue the macrolide-based combination regimen. In the last 4 months, she has been in this therapy without the need for antibiotic treatment.

Case Report

On Two Cases with Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome: Importance of Immunological Parameters for Clinical Course and Follow-Up

Autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome (AD-HIES) is a rare disease described in 1966. It is characterized by severe dermatitis, a peculiar face, frequent infections, extremely high levels of serum IgE and eosinophilia, all resulting from a defect in the STAT3 gene. A variety of mutations in the SH2 and DNA-binding domain have been described, and several studies have searched for associations between the severity of the clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, and the type of genetic alteration. We present two children with AD-HIES–a girl with the most common STAT3 mutation (R382W) and a boy with a rare variant (G617E) in the same gene, previously reported in only one other patient. Herein, we discuss the clinical and immunological findings in our patients, focusing on their importance on disease course and management.

Case Report

Adverse Events of the BCG (Bacillus Calmette–Guérin) and Rotavirus Vaccines in a Young Infant with Inborn Error of Immunity

Background. The Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) and rotavirus vaccines are live-attenuated preparations. In the United Arab Emirates, these products are universally administered to the young infants. This unguided practice does not account for the children with immunodeficiency, which frequently manifests after the administration of these vaccines. We present here a young infant with immunodeficiency that developed disseminated tuberculosis infection and severe diarrhea due to these improper immunizations. Case Presentation. This young infant was diagnosed at six months of age with “immunodeficiency type 19” (MIM#615617) due to homozygous nonsense variant, NM_000732.4 (CD3D):c.128G > A, p.Trp43∗ (variation ClinVar#VCV000643120.1; pathogenic). This variant creates premature stop-gain in CD3D (CD3 antigen, delta subunit, autosomal recessive; MIM#186790), resulting in loss-of-function. He also had “X-linked agammaglobulinemia” (MIM#300755) due to hemizygous missense variant, NM_001287344.1 (BTK):c.80G > A, p.Gly27Asp (novel). He had a sibling who passed away in infancy of unknown disease and family members with autoimmune disorders. Despite these clear clues, he was immunized with BCG at birth and rotavirus at 2 and 4 months. He was well in the first four months. He then developed high-fever, lymphadenopathy, and refractory diarrhea. Stool was positive for rotavirus, and lymph node biopsy showed acid-fast bacilli, consistent with tuberculosis lymphadenitis. These infections were serious and markedly complicated his clinical course, which included bone marrow transplantation from a matched sibling. Conclusions. These unfortunate events could have been avoided by compiling the available clinical information. This patient underscores the importance of implementing proper policies for BCG and rotavirus vaccinations. International registries of adverse events of universally administered vaccines are crucial.

Case Report

A Case of Prolonged Catatonia Caused by Sjögren’s Syndrome

Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder, often associated with some neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as systemic lupus erythematosus. Although catatonia is frequently reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, it has been rarely reported in patients with SS. Herein, we present a case of SS with catatonia effectively and safely treated with modified electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A 58-year-old woman showed prolonged catatonia and depressive mood along with pathologically dried eye and mouth. Based on physical findings and blood tests, she was diagnosed with SS. Because of the presence of pressure sores, we were unable to perform lumbar puncture for the diagnosis of abacterial encephalitis. Alternatively, single-photon emission computed tomography of her brain revealed multifocal hypoperfused areas in the parietotemporal region. Consequently, we performed ECT for the treatment of catatonia comorbid with SS. Following 20 sessions of ECT, the catatonia was improved without obvious adverse effects. One week after the last ECT, elevated levels of interleukin-6 were identified in the cerebral fluid. After receiving steroid pulse therapy, she has not experienced catatonia for more than 5 years. SS can cause catatonia, and ECT is a safe and effective option for the treatment of catatonia with SS.

Case Report

Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinase 4 Deficiency in a Greek Teenager

Background. Human interleukin- (IL-) 1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK-4) deficiency is a recently described primary immunodeficiency. It is a rare, autosomal recessive immunodeficiency that impairs toll/IL-1R immunity, except for the toll-like receptor (TLR) 3- and TLR4-interferon alpha (IFNA)/beta (IFNB) pathways. Case Report. We report the first patient in Greece with IRAK-4 deficiency. From the age of 8 months, she presented with recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract and skin abscesses. For this, she had been repeatedly hospitalized and treated empirically with intravenous antibiotics. No severe viral, mycobacterial, or fungal infections were noted. Her immunological laboratory evaluation revealed low serum IgA and restored in subsequent measurements; normal IgG, IgM, and IgE; and normal serum IgG subclasses. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and dihydrorhodamine (DHR) test revealed normal counts. She was able to make functional antibodies against vaccine antigens, including tetanus and diphtheria. She was administered with empirical IgG substitution for 5 years until the age of 12 years, and she has never experienced invasive bacterial infections so far. DNA analysis revealed a heterozygous variant in the patient: c.823delT (p.S275fs13 at protein level) in the IRAK4 gene. Conclusions. The importance of clinical suspicion is emphasized in order to confirm the diagnosis by IRAK4 gene sequencing and provide the appropriate treatment for this rare primary immunodeficiency, as soon as possible.

Case Reports in Immunology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate31%
Submission to final decision63 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
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