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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 519215, 3 pages
Case Report

Phytocontact Dermatitis due to Mustard Seed Mimicking Burn Injury: Report of a Case

1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, 06490 Ankara, Turkey
2Department of Surgery, Diyarbakir Education and Research Hospital, 21400 Diyarbakir, Turkey

Received 15 November 2011; Revised 20 March 2012; Accepted 21 March 2012

Academic Editor: Jeffrey M. Weinberg

Copyright © 2012 Hakan Yabanoglu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Mustard seeds have been used in traditional folk medicine as a stimulant, diuretic, and purgative and to treat a variety of ailments including peritonitis and neuralgia. Mustards are still used today in mustard plasters to treat rheumatism, arthritis, chest congestion, aching back, and sore muscles. To make a mustard plaster, mix equal parts of flour and powdered mustard and spread it as a paste on a doubled piece of soft cloth. Apply mustard plaster to the affected area for a maximum of 15 minutes. Prolonged application can result in burns to the skin and nerve damage. Skin lesions occur within hours after exposure, and there is no significant therapy procedure. This case report is about a patient with second-degree burn, occurred when a mixture including mustard seed was exposed to her skin in the pain therapy of the osteoarthritis in her left knee. There are no studies analyzing treatment of skin burns induced by mustard seed in the literature. While in this type of burns our experience is limited, we think that conservative approach should be first choice of treatment.