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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2014, Article ID 381480, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/381480
Case Report

Maraviroc Failed to Control Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy-Associated IRIS in a Patient with Advanced HIV Infection

1Centro de Investigación en Enfermedades Infecciosas, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Ismael Cosío Villegas, Calzada de Tlalpan 4502, Colonia Sección XVI, 14080 México, DF, Mexico
2Servicio de Patología, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Ismael Cosío Villegas, 14080 México, DF, Mexico
3Servicio Clínico 4, Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Respiratorias Ismael Cosío Villegas, 14080 México, DF, Mexico

Received 23 September 2014; Accepted 11 December 2014; Published 23 December 2014

Academic Editor: Bruno Megarbane

Copyright © 2014 Mónica Rodríguez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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