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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1084063, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1084063
Case Report

Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

1Department of Chest Diseases, Yedikule Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Kazlıçeşme, Belgrat Kapı yolu Cad. 1, Zeytinburnu, 34020 Istanbul, Turkey
2Department of Chest Diseases, Ondokuz Mayıs University Faculty of Medicine, Samsun, Turkey
3Department of Chest Diseases, Karabük University Faculty of Medicine, Karabük, Turkey
4Department of Chest Diseases, Abant İzzet Baysal University Faculty of Medicine, Bolu, Turkey
5Department of Pathology Yedikule Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Kazlıçeşme, Belgrat Kapı yolu Cad. 1, Zeytinburnu, 34020 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 20 March 2016; Revised 13 July 2016; Accepted 26 July 2016

Academic Editor: Stephen P. Peters

Copyright © 2016 Elif Tanrıverdi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.