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Case Reports in Medicine
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9602432, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9602432
Case Report

A Rare Case of Cavitary Lesion of the Lung Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in an Immunocompetent Patient

1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center Affiliated with Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY, USA
2Department of Medicine, Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center Affiliated with Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Bronx, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Misbahuddin Khaja; moc.oohay@ajahkrd

Received 10 May 2017; Accepted 19 July 2017; Published 21 August 2017

Academic Editor: Takeshi Saraya

Copyright © 2017 Muhammad Kashif et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that most commonly causes upper respiratory tract infections, but it can also cause pneumonia, referred to as “walking pneumonia.” Although cavitary lesions are present in a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes, those attributable to M. pneumoniae are extremely uncommon; thus, to date, epidemiological studies are lacking. Here, we present a rare case of a 20-year-old male, referred to us from a psychiatric facility for evaluation of a cough, who was found to have a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe. An extensive workup for cavitary lesion was negative, but his mycoplasma IgM level was high. A computed tomography (CT) of the chest confirmed the presence of a cavitary lesion. After treatment with levofloxacin antibiotics, a follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the lesion. Our case is a rare presentation of mycoplasma pneumonia as a cavitary lesion in a patient without any known risk factors predisposing to mycoplasma infection. Early recognition and treatment with an appropriate antibiotic may lead to complete resolution of the cavitary lesion.