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Case Reports in Nephrology
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 957583, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/957583
Case Report

An Unexpected Cause of Severe Hypokalemia

Department of Nephrology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, Km. 9100, 28034 Madrid, Spain

Received 27 August 2015; Accepted 21 September 2015

Academic Editor: Helmut H. Schiffl

Copyright © 2015 Fernando Caravaca-Fontan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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