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Case Reports in Nephrology
Volume 2018, Article ID 3174897, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3174897
Case Report

Sticky Platelet Syndrome: An Unrecognized Cause of Acute Thrombosis and Graft Loss

1Internal Medicine Service, General Hospital of Mexico “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”, Mexico City, Mexico
2Transplant Service, General Hospital of Mexico “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”, Mexico City, Mexico
3Pathological Anatomy Service, General Hospital of Mexico “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”, Mexico City, Mexico
4Nephrology Service, General Hospital of Mexico “Dr. Eduardo Liceaga”, Mexico City, Mexico

Correspondence should be addressed to Fabio Solis-Jimenez; moc.liamg@zenemijsilosoibaf and Rafael Valdez-Ortiz; moc.liamg@zedlavafar

Received 28 December 2017; Accepted 13 March 2018; Published 22 April 2018

Academic Editor: Sophia Lionaki

Copyright © 2018 Fabio Solis-Jimenez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Sticky platelet syndrome (SPS) is a prothrombotic disease that is not well recognized and difficult to diagnose. Case Report. We present a case of a 49-year-old diabetic woman on ambulatory peritoneal dialysis therapy who underwent a kidney transplant from living-related donor. The donor was her sister with whom she shared one haplotype and absence of donor specific antibodies. The posttransplant evolution was torpid, developing progressive deterioration, which made us suspect a failure in the graft. Doppler ultrasound reported renal vein thrombosis and hypoperfusion of the renal artery. Without clinical improvement, she required a reintervention that ended in graftectomy, in which the histopathological report showed negative C4d with medullary and cortical infarction. Hematological studies were negative for antibodies against phospholipids, with correct levels of proteins C and S and antithrombin. Platelet aggregometry studies were carried out, which were compatible with SPS. Conclusions. Recognition of SPS in pretransplant studies is difficult if there is no history of previous thrombotic events. However, we must consider this entity in cases of acute thrombosis and loss of the graft of uncertain origin.