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Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 696953, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/696953
Case Report

Atypical Parkinsonism Revealing a Late Onset, Rigid and Akinetic Form of Huntington's Disease

1Department of Neurology and Laboratory of Neuroscience, IRCCS Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Piazzale Brescia 20, 20149 Milan, Italy
2Nuclear Medicine, IRCCS-Ospedale Maggiore, 20122 Milan, Italy
3“Dino Ferrari” Center, University of Milan, 20149 Milan, Italy

Received 30 May 2011; Accepted 11 July 2011

Academic Editors: P. Berlit, A. E. Cavanna, S. T. Gontkovsky, P. Mir, D. J. Rivet, and P. Sandroni

Copyright © 2011 A. Ciammola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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