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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2011, Article ID 281391, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/281391
Case Report

Angiogenic Factors and Renal Disease in Pregnancy

1Department Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
2Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA

Received 10 May 2011; Accepted 5 June 2011

Academic Editors: I. Hoesli, I. Kowalcek, H. Masuyama, and E. C. Nwosu

Copyright © 2011 Julie S. Rhee et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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