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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2014, Article ID 724302, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/724302
Case Report

Necrotizing Fasciitis and Toxic Shock Syndrome from Clostridium septicum following a Term Cesarean Delivery

1Division of Reproductive Infectious Diseases, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
3Division of Gynecological Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA
4Division of Trauma Surgery and Critical Care, Department of General Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425, USA

Received 29 January 2014; Accepted 24 February 2014; Published 13 April 2014

Academic Editor: Anna Fagotti

Copyright © 2014 B. H. Rimawi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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