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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2015, Article ID 760429, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/760429
Case Report

Serous Tubal Intraepithelial Carcinoma: An Incidental Finding at the Time of Prophylactic Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA
2Thornton Gynecologic Oncology Division, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA
3Department of Pathology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA
4Division of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA, USA

Received 23 November 2014; Revised 7 February 2015; Accepted 7 February 2015

Academic Editor: Yoshio Yoshida

Copyright © 2015 Monique Hiersoux Vaughan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC) is a precursor lesion for high-grade pelvic serous carcinoma. The incidence of STIC is estimated to occur in 0.6% to 6% of women who are BRCA positive or have a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Case. A 56-year-old woman underwent robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, rectocele repair, and concurrent bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for recurrent stage 3 pelvic organ prolapse and reported family history of ovarian cancer. Histopathologic examination of her left fallopian tube revealed STIC. Conclusion. We report this rare occurrence of STIC in a patient undergoing surgery primarily for pelvic organ prolapse and having a family history of ovarian cancer. Possible management options include observation with annual physical exam and CA-125, surgical staging, or empiric chemotherapy. However, due to the lack of consensus regarding management options, referral to a gynecologic oncologist is recommended.