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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2016, Article ID 7030382, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7030382
Case Report

Staphylococcus lugdunensis Endocarditis in a 35-Year-Old Woman in Her 24th Week of Pregnancy

1Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
2Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
3Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
5Division of Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria
6Section of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University of Graz, 8036 Graz, Austria

Received 13 December 2015; Revised 3 February 2016; Accepted 11 February 2016

Academic Editor: Svein Rasmussen

Copyright © 2016 Mounir Khafaga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Infective endocarditis is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Guidelines addressing prophylaxis and management of infective endocarditis do not extensively deal with concomitant pregnancy, and case reports on infective endocarditis are scarce. This is the first published report of infective endocarditis by Staphylococcus lugdunensis in a pregnant woman. Case Presentation. We report a single case of a 35-year-old woman in her 24th week of pregnancy who was admitted to our intensive care unit with fever and suspected infectious endocarditis. Blood culture detected Staphylococcus lugdunensis. A vegetation and severe mitral regurgitation due to complete destruction of the valve confirmed the diagnosis. An interdisciplinary panel of cardiologists, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, cardiac and plastic surgeons, infectiologists, anesthesiologists, and neonatologists was formed to determine the best therapeutic strategy. Conclusions. Timing and indications for surgical intervention to prevent embolic complications in infective endocarditis remain controversial. This original case report illustrates how managing infective endocarditis by Staphylococcus lugdunensis particularly in the 24th week of pregnancy can represent a therapeutic challenge to a broad section of specialties across medicine. Critical cases like this require a thorough weighing of risks and benefits followed by swift action to protect the mother and her unborn child.