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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2016, Article ID 7625341, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7625341
Case Report

Prenatal Evidence of Persistent Notochord and Absent Sacrum Caused by a Mutation in the T (Brachyury) Gene

1Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Prenatal Diagnosis, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
2Department of Clinical Genetics, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
4Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
5Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Received 20 October 2016; Accepted 1 December 2016

Academic Editor: Giovanni Monni

Copyright © 2016 F. Fontanella et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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