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Case Reports in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume 2019, Article ID 4325647, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/4325647
Case Report

Severe Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Pregnancy Mimicking HELLP Syndrome

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA
2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Adventist Health White Memorial, Los Angeles, CA, USA
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA
4Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA
5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Richard M. Burwick; gro.shsc@kciwrub.drahcir

Received 29 November 2018; Accepted 18 March 2019; Published 25 March 2019

Academic Editor: Yossef Ezra

Copyright © 2019 Shravya Govindappagari et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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