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Case Reports in Oncological Medicine
Volume 2012, Article ID 183458, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/183458
Case Report

Splenic Hematoma Mimicking Angiosarcoma: A Case Report

1Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, 31100 Serinyol, Turkey
2Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, 31100 Serinyol, Turkey
3Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, 31100 Serinyol, Turkey
4Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay, 31100 Serinyol, Turkey

Received 29 June 2012; Accepted 17 July 2012

Academic Editors: L. Beex and G. Di Vagno

Copyright © 2012 Seckin Akkucuk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Splenic hematomas usually occur after blunt abdominal trauma. Most of the subcapsular hematomas will be resolved and reabsorbed spontaneously. However in rare cases, some of them organize and form calcified splenic masses. Angiosarcoma is an uncommon primary tumor of the spleen. Splenic angiosarcoma behaves extremely aggressive and has poor prognosis. Case Presentation. We report a forty-nine-year-old white male with organized splenic hematoma due to traffic accident mimicking splenic angiosarcoma. Conclusion. Both angiosarcoma and splenic organized hematoma have nonspecific symptoms and clinical findings. Because of the risk of hemorrhage and rupture, fine-needle biopsy should not be preferred. In case of splenic masses, excision and spleen-conserving surgery or total splenectomy should be performed.