Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine
Volume 2013, Article ID 431743, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/431743
Case Report

Merkel Cell Carcinoma of Left Groin: A Case Report and Literature Review

1College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, P.O. Box 50927, Riyadh 11533, Saudi Arabia
2Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria 21526, Egypt
3Department of Surgical Oncology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH&RC), P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia
4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH&RC), P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia
5Department of Plastic Surgery, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH&RC), P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia

Received 31 March 2013; Accepted 9 May 2013

Academic Editors: Y.-F. Jiao and Y. Yamada

Copyright © 2013 Ahmed Abu-Zaid et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon highly aggressive skin malignancy with an increased tendency to recur locally, invade regional lymph nodes, and metastasize distally to lung, liver, brain, bone, and skin. The sun-exposed skin of head and neck is the most frequent site of involvement (55%). We report the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian male patient who presented with a recurrent left inguinal mass for the third time after surgical resection with safe margins and no postoperative radio- or chemotherapy. The presented mass was excised, and pathological diagnosis revealed recurrent MCC. The patient underwent postoperative radiation therapy, and 6 months later, he developed a right groin mass which was resected and pathological diagnosis confirmed metastatic MCC. Six months later, patient developed an oropharyngeal mass which was unresectable, and pathological biopsy confirmed metastatic MCC. Patient was offered palliative radio- and chemotherapy. In this paper, we also present a brief literature review on MCC.