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Case Reports in Oncological Medicine
Volume 2015, Article ID 358572, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/358572
Case Report

New Primary Malignancy Masquerading as Metastatic Prostate Adenocarcinoma

1Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
3Department of Urology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

Received 27 November 2014; Accepted 24 January 2015

Academic Editor: Jose I. Mayordomo

Copyright © 2015 Ellen A. Szwed et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In the management of patients with prostate cancer, the development of new radiographic findings can mimic progression of the disease, thereby triggering changes in treatment. Typically, clinicians evaluate additional parameters, such as symptoms and prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, for further evidence of disease progression. In the absence of additional findings, for example, elevated PSA, the possibility of an additional malignancy should be considered and evaluated. We present three cases of patients undergoing treatment for prostate adenocarcinoma and discovered on imaging to have findings suggestive of disease progression, but ultimately found to be a new primary malignancy. Our cases suggest that, in patients with prostate cancer, the appearance of new lymphadenopathy or bone lesions cannot be assumed to solely represent progression of the prostate cancer and warrant further investigation, especially in the presence of stable PSA levels.