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Case Reports in Orthopedics
Volume 2015, Article ID 560372, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/560372
Case Report

Antecubital Fossa Solitary Osteochondroma with Associated Bicipitoradial Bursitis

1Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Mater Dei Hospital, Triq Dun Karm, Msida MSD 2090, Malta
2Clinica Ortopedica, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, 4 Via De Crecchio, 80138 Napoli, Italy

Received 15 June 2015; Accepted 11 August 2015

Academic Editor: Kaan Erler

Copyright © 2015 Colin Ng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Antecubital fossa lesions are uncommon conditions that present to the orthopaedic clinic. Furthermore, the radius bone is an uncommonly reported location for an osteochondroma, especially when presenting with a concurrent reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. Osteochondromas are a type of developmental lesion rather than a true neoplasm. They constitute up to 15% of all bone tumours and up to 50% of benign bone tumours. They may occur as solitary or multiple lesions. Multiple lesions are usually associated with a syndrome known as hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Malignant transformation is known to occur but is rare. Bicipitoradial bursitis is a condition which can occur as primary or secondary (reactive) pathology. In our case, the radius bone osteochondroma caused reactive bicipitoradial bursitis. The differential diagnosis of such antecubital fossa masses is vast but may be narrowed down through a targeted history, stepwise radiological investigations, and histological confirmation. Our aim is to ensure that orthopaedic clinicians keep a wide differential in mind when dealing with antecubital fossa mass lesions.