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Case Reports in Otolaryngology
Volume 2016, Article ID 7342910, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7342910
Case Report

Ectomesenchymal Chondromyxoid Tumour of the Dorsal Tongue Presenting with Impaired Speech

1Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, 6299 South Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2
2Division of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 6299 South Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2
3Division of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, 6299 South Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4R2

Received 26 January 2016; Revised 21 March 2016; Accepted 10 April 2016

Academic Editor: Andrea Gallo

Copyright © 2016 Laura A. Schep et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumours (ECTs) are rare mesenchymal soft tissue neoplasms that typically present as a slow-growing asymptomatic mass on the anterior dorsum of the tongue. Our patient presented with impaired speech articulation and pain associated with upper respiratory tract infections when the lesion on his dorsal tongue would swell, and he would accidentally bite down on it. Microscopically, ECTs appear as unencapsulated, well-circumscribed proliferations of uniform round to fusiform cells embedded within chondromyxoid matrices. Most cases of ECT have been detected in the third to the sixth decades of life, with no sex preference. ECT may cause a range of symptoms that negatively impact patients’ quality of life, including pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, bleeding, and, in the case of our patient, impairment of speech. We provide a unique preoperative clinical photograph and case description that should help readers in recognizing this neoplasm. Considering the rarity of ECT presenting clinically as well as in the literature, we believe this report will add to our growing understanding of ECT and its management. We report a case of ECT presenting on the anterior dorsal tongue that was successfully surgically resected under local anesthesia with clear margins, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature.