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Case Reports in Otolaryngology
Volume 2017, Article ID 1010975, 4 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1010975
Case Report

Aspiration of Aluminum Beverage Can Tab: Case Report and Literature Review

Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Alhasan N. Elghouche; ude.iupui@cuohglea

Received 20 March 2017; Accepted 8 May 2017; Published 28 May 2017

Academic Editor: M. Tayyar Kalcioglu

Copyright © 2017 Alhasan N. Elghouche et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

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