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Case Reports in Pediatrics
Volume 2016, Article ID 3010594, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3010594
Case Report

Management of Ankyloglossia and Breastfeeding Difficulties in the Newborn: Breastfeeding Sessions, Myofunctional Therapy, and Frenotomy

1Service of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hospital de Nens de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
2Service of Pediatric Dentistry, Hospital de Nens de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
4Service of Speech and Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy, Hospital de Nens de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
5Service of Pediatrics and Service of Human Lactation, Hospital de Nens de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
6Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Oral Public Health, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain

Received 21 June 2016; Accepted 8 August 2016

Academic Editor: Isolina Riaño Galán

Copyright © 2016 Elvira Ferrés-Amat et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The problems of suction in newborns give rise to multiple consequences for both the mother and the newborn. The objective of this paper is to present a case of ankyloglossia (“tongue-tie”) and the suction problems that were treated by a multidisciplinary team. The subject is a 17-day-old male patient, with ankyloglossia and suction problems during breastfeeding (pain in the breastfeeding mother, poor weight gain, and long breastfeeds). The patient followed the circuit established in our centre between the services of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Breastfeeding and Speech Therapy and Orofacial Rehabilitation (CELERE). The evolution following the breastfeeding sessions, the myofunctional stimulation, and the lingual frenotomy was very favourable, thereby solving the suction problems that the newborn presented. All our patients receive breastfeeding sessions and myofunctional therapy as treatment. We know that a frenotomy is not always necessary and we believe that the stimulation of sucking before and after the surgical intervention is important in order to improve the final result.