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Case Reports in Psychiatry
Volume 2013, Article ID 381261, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/381261
Case Report

Amphetamine Positive Urine Toxicology Screen Secondary to Atomoxetine

1Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859-5000, USA
3Department of Psychiatry, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859-5000, USA
4Department of Pharmacy, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Road, Honolulu, HI 96859-5000, USA

Received 13 December 2012; Accepted 1 January 2013

Academic Editors: I. G. Anghelescu, M. Kluge, D. L. Noordsy, and F. Oyebode

Copyright © 2013 Joshua L. Fenderson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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