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Case Reports in Psychiatry
Volume 2016, Article ID 1393982, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1393982
Case Report

Late-Onset Mania in a Patient with Movement Disorder and Basal Ganglia Calcifications: A Challenge for Diagnosis and Treatment

1Department of Neurosciences, Section of Psychiatry, University of Padova, 35128 Padova, Italy
2Department of Psychiatry, University of Pisa, 56121 Pisa, Italy
3The Institute of Behavioral Sciences “G. De Lisio”, 56127 Pisa, Italy

Received 8 February 2016; Revised 29 March 2016; Accepted 6 April 2016

Academic Editor: Erik Jönsson

Copyright © 2016 Beatrice Roiter et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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