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Case Reports in Radiology
Volume 2012, Article ID 310359, 3 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/310359
Case Report

Medulloblastoma with Excessive Nodularity: Radiographic Features and Pathologic Correlate

1The Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, 3020 Children’s Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
2The Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, 3020 Children’s Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
3The Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, 3020 Children’s Way, San Diego, CA 92123, USA
4The Department of Neurosciences, University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s Hospital, 8010 Frost St., Suite 400, San Diego, CA 92123, USA

Received 17 September 2012; Accepted 2 October 2012

Academic Editors: G. Bastarrika, K. Hayakawa, and S. Yalcin

Copyright © 2012 L. A. Yeh-Nayre et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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