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Case Reports in Radiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1346895, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1346895
Case Report

Fatal Meningitis in a 14-Month-Old with Currarino Triad

1Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
2Medical Imaging, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
3General Pediatrics, King Abdullah Specialist Children’s Hospital, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
4Pediatric Radiology, King Abdullah Specialist Children’s Hospital, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia

Received 9 April 2016; Revised 10 July 2016; Accepted 25 July 2016

Academic Editor: Atsushi Komemushi

Copyright © 2016 Hanan Mohammed Al Qahtani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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