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Case Reports in Radiology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5184196, 4 pages
Case Report

Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis in Isolated Tuberculous Cervical Lymphadenopathy

Department of Radio-Diagnosis, Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College and Research Center, Pimpri, Pune, India

Received 9 July 2016; Accepted 23 October 2016

Academic Editor: Vincent Low

Copyright © 2016 Sanjay Khaladkar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Tuberculosis is a common infectious disease with a high prevalence in developing countries and presents a major public health issue. Internal jugular vein (IJV) thrombosis is a rare complication in tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy. We report a case of 26-year male patient with a history of low-grade evening rise in fever, dry cough, loss of appetite, and loss of weight with swelling in lower neck on right side. Ultrasonography (USG) neck showed well-defined hypoechoic lymph nodes posterior to right IJV and common carotid artery in the lower neck at level IV and in the right supraclavicular region showing central necrotic areas with adjoining IJV thrombosis. The association between tuberculosis and deep vein thrombosis is rare. Awareness of IJV thrombosis in isolated cervical lymphadenopathy needs high diagnostic suspicion and prompt treatment to avoid fatal complication. Our case is rare as there was isolated tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy with adjoining IJV thrombosis. Both USG and computed tomography (CT) are accurate and reliable radiological investigations for detecting IJV thrombosis along with cervical lymph nodes. They are useful in assessing surrounding soft tissue and fat planes and knowing the size and extent of cervical lymphadenopathy. USG is inexpensive and readily available for monitoring response to treatment.