Case Reports in Urology
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Acceptance rate39%
Submission to final decision56 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
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Robotic-Assisted Partial Nephrectomy and Adrenalectomy: Case of a Pheochromocytoma Invading into Renal Parenchyma

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Case Reports in Urology publishes case reports and case series focusing on the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs.

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Case Report

Extensive Prostatic Abscess in an Elderly Patient Requiring Multidisciplinary Drainage

Background. Prostatic abscess is rare and mainly affects immunocompromised individuals, classically presenting with both systemic and lower urinary tract symptoms. Our case is unique as the patient presented with an exceptionally long duration of symptoms prior to seeing a health-care provider, had no systemic symptoms, and was managed via a multidisciplinary approach. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 70-year-old man with type-two diabetes who endured two months of lower urinary tract symptoms and constipation without systemic symptoms prior to seeking medical attention. He had a positive urinalysis and culture and was initially thought to have a urinary tract infection; however, computed tomography scan revealed a large, complex, and multiloculated prostatic abscess. Multidisciplinary drainage of the abscess was performed by interventional radiology and urology. A postoperative Foley catheter was left in place, and the patient recovered without complications. Discussion. Prostatic abscess is uncommon and presents almost exclusively in patients with immunocompromising conditions such as diabetes. Prior to the advent of antibiotics, the major causes were gonorrheal and Staphylococcus aureus infections, but with the advent of antibiotics, microbial culprits have shifted to gram-negative organisms. Patients typically present with lower urinary tract symptoms, perineal or lower back pain, and systemic symptoms. Management often consists of intravenous antibiotics and surgical drainage either by transrectal ultrasound-guided needle aspiration, or transurethral deroofing of the prostate. Our case highlights the following: (a) the importance of a high index of suspicion for a prostatic abscess in an immunocompromised patient with persistent leukocytosis and perineal pain after treatment with antibiotics and (b) the potential for an early multidisciplinary approach to draining extensive, loculated prostatic abscesses.

Case Report

Advanced Renal Pelvic Carcinoma Revealed after Treatment of a Staghorn Calculus by Endoscopic Combined Intrarenal Surgery

Renal pelvis carcinoma associated with staghorn calculus is a clinically rare condition. A 66-year-old man presented with flank pain due to an 8 cm complete staghorn calculus. We performed three lithotomies using endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery and carried out intraoperative biopsy. Histopathological examinations revealed a keratinized lesion. One month later, contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed an advanced renal pelvis carcinoma. These findings demonstrate that even an intraoperative biopsy may be insufficient to diagnose a renal pelvis carcinoma associated with a staghorn calculus. The possibility of RPCa developing when treating a long-standing staghorn calculus should therefore be kept in mind.

Case Report

Renal Carcinoma and Kartagener Syndrome: An Unusual Association

Background. The association of renal cell carcinoma and Kartagener’s syndrome is unusual, and only eleven cases have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this work is to analyze this unusual association of Kartagener’s syndrome and renal cell tumor and to study the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects through our observation and review of the literature. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 50-year-old patient, with a history of recurrent respiratory infections, in whom a renal tumor was simultaneously diagnosed with Kartagener’s syndrome, represented by situs inversus, bronchiectasia, and chronic sinusitis. The patient was treated by partial nephrectomy, and the histological examination showed a clear cell carcinoma. Through this observation and a review of the literature, we try to analyze this association as well as the main diagnostic and therapeutic aspects. Conclusion. The association of situs inversus and renal cell carcinoma is very rare—preoperative assessment and anatomy knowledge are crucial for a better adaptation of the surgical technique.

Case Report

A Mislocated Intrauterine Device Migrating to the Urinary Bladder: An Uncommon Complication Leading to Stone Formation

Intrauterine devices are a popular form of reversible contraception among women. Its administration can lead to some uncommon but serious complications such as perforation leading to its migration into adjacent organs. Like any foreign body, the presence of an IUD in the bladder can result in stone formation due to its lithogenic potential. We report a case of an IUD migrating from its normal position in the uterine cavity into the urinary bladder causing chronic low urinary tract symptoms in a 43-year-old female patient. The device was securely removed without complications using grasping forceps under cystoscopy, and no parietal defect was detected. A mislocated IUD is a rare complication that should be considered in female patients presenting with chronic urinary symptoms.

Case Report

Case Report: Prolapsed Ureterocele—A Differential Diagnosis of Urethral Cists

Ureterocele is a cystic dilatation of submucosal distal ureter. It presents a higher incidence in infants and young children but is rare in adults. The urethral prolapse of ureterocele is extremely rare, and its clinical presentation includes vulvar mass, hematuria, and urinary tract dysfunction. We present a case of ureterocele prolapse in a 45-year-old woman who has a 3-day-evolution vulvar mass and intense urethral bleeding. The patient underwent armed cystoscopy and ureteroscopy, ureterocele resection, and biopsy. She evolved with good postoperative condition and was then discharged.

Case Report

Recurrent Anterior Vaginal Wall Hernia after a Radical Cystectomy

True pelvic floor areas are uncommon conditions, but they can occur after extensive pelvic surgery including radical cystectomies or pelvic exenteration. We present the case of a patient with a persistent hernia that failed a native tissue repair and required a prosthetic mesh implant as definitive surgical treatment.

Case Reports in Urology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate39%
Submission to final decision56 days
Acceptance to publication18 days
CiteScore-
Impact Factor-
 Submit

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