Case Reports in Urology
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Necrotizing Epididymo-Orchitis: A Rare Manifestation of COVID-19

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Case Reports in Urology publishes case reports and case series focusing on the male and female urinary tract and the male reproductive organs.

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Case Reports in Urology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Primary Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Prostate with Rectal Invasion

Prostate adenosquamous carcinoma (pASC) is a rare form of prostate cancer accounting for <1% of all cases. It is generally considered an aggressive variant often presenting with significant symptom burden and/or metastatic disease. Given its rarity, optimal management of this cancer is unknown. We present a case of a patient with pASC treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy with excellent symptomatic improvement and local control.

Case Report

Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy with Heminephrectomy for Urothelial Carcinoma of the Upper Renal Pelvis on the Left Side of the Horseshoe Kidney

A 70-year-old male was diagnosed with urothelial carcinoma of the upper renal pelvis on the left side of the horseshoe kidney. Preoperative thin-slice contrast-enhanced CT with three-dimensional reconstruction of the images revealed that two arteries arising from the aorta supplied the left moiety of the horseshoe kidney. He underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal nephroureterectomy with heminephrectomy on the left side of the horseshoe kidney visualized by indocyanine green fluorescence system. The histopathological findings of the renal pelvic tumor revealed invasive urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation, high grade, and pT3.

Case Report

Metastasis to the Bladder: A Rare Site of Recurrence of Renal Cell Carcinoma

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is considered to be the deadliest urologic cancer with high rates of metastasis and recurrence after nephrectomy. RCC can metastasize to nearly any organ but most commonly metastasizes to the liver, lung, brain, and bone. To date, there are only about 40 reported cases of RCC with solitary bladder metastasis. The following report contributes to this limited data set of patients with RCC who develop solitary metastasis to the bladder. A 69-year-old male presented with occasional gross hematuria and was found to have a left renal mass infiltrating the collecting system. Ureteroscopic biopsy revealed clear cell RCC, and the patient subsequently underwent radical left nephrectomy. Eight months after nephrectomy, the patient presented to the clinic with gross hematuria. In-office cystoscopy demonstrated a nodular lesion in the bladder arising from the left ureteral orifice. The patient underwent transurethral resection of the bladder mass and pathology demonstrated clear cell RCC. Subsequent imaging showed no evidence of metastatic disease. Five months after transurethral resection, the patient was found to have a left distal ureteral mass and underwent left ureterectomy with partial cystectomy. Pathology again demonstrated clear cell RCC. RCC with solitary metastasis to the bladder is rare, and there are no targeted guideline recommendations for management. Per standard of care, patients with painless hematuria and risk factors for malignancy should undergo cystoscopy. In patients with a history of RCC, metastasis to the bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Patients with metastatic RCC to the bladder should undergo a thorough work-up for additional sites of metastasis. In patients with RCC who develop solitary bladder metastasis amenable to resection following nephrectomy, there is a lack of evidence to guide therapy and a multidisciplinary discussion is warranted. However, if the tumor is amenable to resection, metastasectomy is a reasonable therapeutic approach and offers the patient an improved quality of life and an opportunity for remission.

Case Report

Melanosis of the Bladder: Possible Pathogenetic Mechanisms

Melanin accumulation within the bladder urothelium and/or macrophages in the lamina propria (melanosis of the bladder) is a very rare phenomenon of unknown pathogenesis. Its rarity argues for a complex, likely multifactorial, causation. We describe bladder melanosis developing after Botox therapy in an elderly woman with a history of overactive bladder, treated grade 2 uterovaginal prolapse, and episodes of urinary tract infection and speculate that one factor (probably of many) in its pathogenesis may be a derangement of local neurourothelial interactions.

Case Report

A Case of Traumatic Catheterisation leading to Rectal Perforation and Periprostatic Abscess

A 79-year-old gentleman presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with catheter-related issues on a background of a long-term catheter for previous urinary retention, Hartmann’s procedure for colorectal cancer, and brachytherapy for prostate cancer. A 3-way silicone catheter was placed by ED staff and bladder irrigation commenced. The urine draining following catheterisation was found to be dark and thick, and irrigation fluid was noted to be draining per rectum. CT imaging was performed and demonstrated the catheter tip extending through the posterior wall of the urethra and into the rectum. The patient was admitted under the urology team, and urinary diversion was achieved with a suprapubic catheter. Subsequent imaging demonstrated a periprostatic abscess, which was initially managed with antimicrobial therapy, followed by attempted image-guided drainage. Repeat imaging following a 6-week course of antibiotics failed to show an improvement in the collection. During his inpatient stay, he contracted COVID-19 and passed away suddenly. This case demonstrates the potential catastrophic consequences associated with urethral catheterisation.

Case Report

Rapidly Progressive Bladder Cancer Diagnosed because of Spontaneous Bladder Rupture

Background. Spontaneous bladder rupture (SBR) is very rare and can be associated with advanced bladder cancer. Because of its rarity, the optimal management of bladder cancer with SBR has not been established. Herein, we report a case of SBR due to locally advanced bladder cancer, which rapidly invaded the ileum and caused peritoneal dissemination. Case Presentation. An 86-year-old man presented with sudden-onset lower abdominal pain and distension. The patient was diagnosed with bladder perforation and bladder tumor on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT). Transurethral resection of the bladder tumor revealed an invasive urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation. Although radical cystectomy with lymph node dissection was planned, preoperative CECT and magnetic resonance imaging revealed enlargement of the bilateral iliac regional lymph nodes, multiple peritoneal nodules, and invasion of the bladder tumor to the ileocecum. Therefore, cystectomy and resection of ileocecum with palliative intent and bilateral cutaneous ureterostomy were performed. However, the patient’s general condition rapidly worsened after surgery, and he died 74 days after the initial diagnosis. Conclusions. We encountered a case of SBR accompanied by bladder cancer with extremely rapid progression, which suggested the importance of short-interval repeat imaging examinations. Emergency surgery should be considered when bladder cancer is suspected in patients with SBR so as not to miss the window period of a possible cure.

Case Reports in Urology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate34%
Submission to final decision90 days
Acceptance to publication15 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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