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Case Reports in Urology
Volume 2016, Article ID 2586458, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2586458
Case Report

Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Acquired Nontraumatic Urethral Strictures in Boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon

1Pediatric Surgery Service, Yaoundé Gynaeco-Obstetric and Pediatric Hospital (YGOPH), Yaoundé, Cameroon
2University of Geneva Teaching Hospital, Genève, Switzerland
3Lyon Teaching Hospital, Lyon, France

Received 9 December 2015; Revised 13 March 2016; Accepted 27 March 2016

Academic Editor: Ferdinando Fusco

Copyright © 2016 F. F. Mouafo Tambo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. Urethral strictures in boys denote narrowing of the urethra which can be congenital or acquired. In case of acquired strictures, the etiology is iatrogenic or traumatic and rarely infectious or inflammatory. The aim of this study was to highlight the diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of acquired nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Methodology. The authors report five cases of nontraumatic urethral strictures managed at the Pediatric Surgery Department of the YGOPH over a two-year period (November 2012–November 2014). In order to confirm the diagnosis of urethral stricture, all patients were assessed with both cystourethrography and urethrocystoscopy. Results. In all the cases the urethra was inflammatory with either a single or multiple strictures. The surgical management included internal urethrotomy (), urethral dilatation (), vesicostomy (), and urethral catheterization (). With a median follow-up of 8.2 months (4–16 months) all patients remained symptoms-free. Conclusion. The authors report the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis and management of nontraumatic urethral strictures in boys at a tertiary hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The existence of an inflammatory etiology of urethral strictures in boys deserves to be considered.