Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine
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Acceptance rate59%
Submission to final decision71 days
Acceptance to publication68 days
CiteScore0.230
Impact Factor-
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Subcutaneous B Cell Lymphoma in a Dog from the West Indies

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Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine publishes case reports and case series in all areas of veterinary medicine.

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Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Case Report

Osteoarticular Infection in Three Young Thoroughbred Horses Caused by a Novel Gram Negative Cocco-Bacillus

We describe three cases of osteoarticular infection (OAI) in young thoroughbred horses in which the causative organism was identified by MALDI-TOF as Kingella species. The pattern of OAI resembled that reported with Kingella infection in humans. Analysis by 16S rRNA PCR enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree that placed the isolates closer to Simonsiella and Alysiella species, rather than Kingella species. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) comparison between the new isolate and Kingella kingae and Alysiella crassa however revealed low probability that the new isolate belonged to either of these species. This preliminary analysis suggests the organism isolated is a previously unrecognised species.

Case Report

Spontaneous Appearance and Transmission of Polydactyly in Dexter Cattle

A 3-yr-old Dexter cow and her yearling Dexter heifer calf exhibited polydactyly. Neither animal was linebred within 5 generations. This cow-calf pair represented the first reported occurrence of polydactyly in Dexter cattle in the US or abroad. Based upon external examination, the cow was classified as having a spontaneous unilateral case of polydactyly with an extra digit along the medial digit of the right front limb and the heifer was classified as having bilateral polydactyly because both front limbs exhibited an extra digit along the medial digit. Radiographic examination confirmed bilateral status of the heifer and revealed bilateral status of the cow. The front feet of the cow and heifer had extra bone formation consistent with an extra digit along the medial digit. Neither animal suffered from limited mobility to date or required hoof treatments. The cow produced a second calf from a different sire, a bull calf that did not appear polydactylous per external examination and was not examined radiographically. The two polydactylous animals will remain in the breeding herd to produce more study calves unless their fitness becomes compromised. Genetic aspects of the cases are discussed.

Case Report

Successful Treatment of a Coxofemoral Luxation in a Shetland Pony by Closed Reduction and Prolonged Immobilization Using a Full-Body Animal Rescue Sling

A 12-year-old, 170 kg, Shetland pony mare was presented with an acute severe right pelvic limb lameness and concurrent upward fixation of the right patella. The affected limb was rotated externally and adducted with a prominent greater trochanter and the right calcaneal tuber being more proximal than its left counterpart. Radiographic examination revealed complete dislocation of the right femoral head from the acetabular cavity in a dorsal and caudal direction. A closed reduction of the coxofemoral luxation was performed successfully under general anaesthesia. A full-body animal rescue and transportation sling (ARTS) was applied for the recovery. The reduction was followed by a right-sided medial patellar desmotomy. The pony was supported in the ARTS for a total of eight weeks combined with crossties for the first six weeks. Subsequently, the mare was discharged with instructions to slowly increase walking exercise over a period of two months before returning to her intended use. A follow-up after 22 months attested the successful treatment of a coxofemoral luxation by closed reduction and prolonged immobilization resulting in a regularly exercised pony without any residual lameness.

Case Report

Suspected Radiation-Induced Osteosarcoma in a Domestic Shorthair Cat

A 3-year-old, male neutered domestic shorthair cat, presented for acute onset tail paresis. He was diagnosed with a spindle cell tumour at the level of L7-CD1 and treated with course fractionation radiation therapy. Three years following radiation therapy, the cat developed chondroblastic osteosarcoma of the pelvis, suspected to be secondary to radiation therapy. Hemipelvectomy was performed and the cat was treated with radiation therapy for remaining gross disease. The cat was euthanized 127 days post-operatively due to suspected metastatic disease. Development of radiation-induced tumours should be considered as a rare late complication in cats undergoing radiation therapy.

Case Report

Ovariohysterectomy and Partial Vaginectomy for Treatment of Cervicovaginitis in a Dog

A 1-year-old sexually intact female Labrador Retriever was evaluated for malodorous vaginal discharge, lethargy, and vomiting. A diagnosis of pyometra was suspected based on signalment, clinical signs, and abdominal ultrasonography. The dog underwent an exploratory celiotomy revealing a palpably enlarged cervix and edematous, fluid-filled vagina with an otherwise normal uterus. The ovaries, uterus, cervix, and cranial vagina were surgically resected. Histopathology revealed mild to moderate regionally extensive subacute neutrophilic cervicovaginitis due to an unknown underlying etiology. The dog did not exhibit any postoperative complications or recurrence of clinical signs in 6 months. This case represents an unusual disease condition, which presented in a manner typical for pyometra, yet required more extensive surgical resection.

Case Report

Salmonella typhimurium Endocarditis and Myocarditis in a Cat

An 8-month-old neutered male outdoor cat was brought to our surgical center for a sudden onset of diarrhea, pyrexia, and lethargy. Physical examination revealed a loud left parasternal systolic murmur with no thrill. An echocardiogram showed a large hyperechoic vegetation (about 9 mm thick) on the aortic valve leaflets. The results of Doppler ultrasound examination were compatible with severe aortic stenosis. A singular urine culture test performed by cystocentesis samples enabled the isolation of more than 105 CFU/ml in a pure culture of Salmonella typhimurium. Enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes and moderate dilatation of small bowel loops were found on abdominal ultrasound examination. The patient was treated with marbofloxacin (2 mg/kg IM every 24 hours), cefazoline (20 mg/kg SC every 12 hours), metronidazole (10 mg/Kg IV every 12 hours), clopidogrel (18.75 mg PO every 24 hours), atenolol (0.5 mg/kg OS every 12 hours), and fluid therapy (ringer acetate 2.5 ml/kg/h), but after three days in hospital the patient died from presumed septic shock. A urine culture revealed that Salmonella typhimurium was sensitive to third generation cephalosporins but not to fluoroquinolones. Necropsy, histologic examinations, culture of the aortic valve, and PCR analysis of the aortic valve leaflets were eventually performed and Salmonella typhimurium endocarditis with myocardial phlegmon was confirmed. Endocarditis is a rare disease in cats and poorly described in the veterinary literature. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of Salmonella typhimurium endocarditis and myocarditis in a cat.

Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate59%
Submission to final decision71 days
Acceptance to publication68 days
CiteScore0.230
Impact Factor-
 Submit