Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication62 days
CiteScore0.200
Impact Factor-

Unilateral Urogenital Disontogeny in a Dog

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Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine publishes case reports and case series in all areas of veterinary medicine.

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Case Report

Polymicrobial Necrotizing Fasciitis in a Dog: The Involvement of Macrococcus caseolyticus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli

A male mixed breed dog was presented with two large wounds, extending the epidermis, dermis, and fascia: one at the dorsum of the thoracolumbar region and the other at the lumbosacral area. Lesions had extended inconspicuously to the dorsum of thorax affecting a large area, which showed regions with necrotic and crepitating foci after shaving. Based on histopathological and bacterial culture examinations, polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis (NF) was diagnosed. Using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper identification technique, Macrococcus caseolyticus, Proteus mirabilis, and Escherichia coli were identified. Hitherto, there is no report on these bacteria linking them simultaneously to NF in a dog. In addition, the authors highlight other microbes associated with NF in humans and animals.

Case Report

Surgical Treatment of Oesophagostomum spp. Nodular Infection in a Chimpanzee at the CIRMF Primatology Center, Gabon

Oesophagostomosis is a zoonotic disease caused by nematodes of the genus Oesophagostomum in the intestinal walls of many species, including ruminants, pigs, humans, and nonhuman primates. Although great apes appear to tolerate the parasite in the wild, they can develop a clinical form that can lead to death in captivity and the natural environment. At the Primatology Centre of the International Centre for Medical Research in Franceville (CIRMF) in Gabon, we recorded 4 deaths of chimpanzees (Pan t. troglodytes) caused by Oesophagostomum spp. between 2015 and 2019. In each case, coprological analysis was positive for strongylid eggs and abdominal ultrasound revealed nodules about 4 cm in diameter on the intestinal and abdominal walls. Albendazole treatments administered by mouth in two doses of 400 mg six months apart resulted in the disappearance of the parasite in coprological samples but the chimpanzees still died. Autopsies carried out on all four chimpanzees revealed a rupture of the cysts and a discharge of pus into the abdomen in each case. We report surgical management involving the removal of Oesophagostomum spp. cysts from a chimpanzee following coprological analysis and abdominal ultrasound examination. Surgical exploration confirmed the fragility of the cystic walls, the rupture of which we avoided. This 5th new case of Oesophagostomum ssp. nodules recovered without complications following the operation and could rejoin his group. We suggest that surgical intervention should be considered in similar cases in captive primates, especially chimpanzees.

Case Report

Ovine Progressive Pneumonia: Diagnosis and Seroprevalence in the South of Sonora, Mexico

Ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) is the most severe presentation of small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection known as Maedi-Visna. Serological evidence in Mexico of the presence of this lentivirus was published in 1986. After that, studies revealed that SRLVs have a broad distribution in Mexico by detecting antibodies or/and molecular tests; however, a descriptive case of the disease has not been published. This work’s objective was to describe the diagnosis of a case of OPP through lesion description, serology, and molecular test. The histopathological study showed that lymph follicular hyperplasia, interstitial pneumonia, and smooth muscle hyperplasia were presented. The serological test demonstrated specific antibodies against the Maedi-Visna virus, and PCR analysis demonstrated a positive outcome. These results include the criteria for the diagnosis of OPP. The serological prevalence of this disease is presented, contributing to the knowledge of the ecology of this disease in the world. This work is the first case report of ovine progressive pneumonia in Mexico and evidence of seroprevalence in sheep herds from Sonora, Mexico.

Case Report

Right Atrioventricular Valvular Dysplasia in a New Zealand White Rabbit

A sixteen-week-old, male New Zealand White rabbit was euthanized following an acute onset of respiratory distress and cyanosis. On necropsy, the rabbit had marked right atrioventricular eccentric hypertrophy, absence or rudimentary presence of the septal leaflet of the right atrioventricular valve, focally extensive left ventricular infarction, diffuse hepatic chronic passive congestion, and diffuse pulmonary edema. To our knowledge, right atrioventricular valvular hypoplasia, dysplasia, or aplasia has not been previously described in rabbits.

Case Report

Diagnosis of Isolated Cleft of the Anterior Mitral Leaflet in a Dog: A Case Study Using Real-Time Three-Dimensional Echocardiography

Isolated cleft of the anterior mitral leaflet (ICAML) in dogs without a septal defect is a rare pathological condition. Until now, only one paper has contributed to the detailed understanding of canine ICAML. Reports have confirmed that 3-dimensional echocardiography (3-DE) is a simple and fast imaging technique that is useful for the diagnosis of ICAML and morphological evaluation of the mitral valve in humans. However, to our knowledge, no studies have provided details about the effectiveness of 3-DE in ICAML diagnosis in dogs. Thus, we aimed to determine the usefulness of a diagnostic technique using 3-DE in a 2-year-old Cavalier King Charles Spaniel with ICAML that exhibited mild mitral valve regurgitation. ICAML was initially assessed by transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography. A diagnosis of congenital mitral regurgitation due to ICAML and understanding of the morphological structure of the valve was established based on the 3-DE findings.

Case Report

Clinical, Parasitological, and Serological Follow-Up of Dogs with Sarcoptic Mange Treated Orally with Lotilaner

Canine sarcoptic mange is a highly pruritic and contagious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis. This case series describes the clinical, parasitological, and serological follow-up of a cohort of eight adult Saint Bernard dogs with confirmed sarcoptic mange, treated orally with lotilaner. Dogs were evaluated initially and after 14 days and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 months for skin lesions, pruritus severity, presence of parasites, and Sarcoptes-IgG levels. A serological indoor allergy panel (IgE) was obtained for seven dogs at day 0 and repeated 12 months later in five dogs to assess potential cross-reactivity between S. scabiei and environmental allergens. Lotilaner was administered to each dog according to the manufacturer’s instructions and was repeated after one and two months without any concurrent therapeutic measure or modification of the husbandry conditions. Pruritus ceased after two weeks. The cutaneous score was reduced by 47%, and skin scrapings were negative for all but three animals. All skin scrapings were negative after one month. Lesions were absent after two months. Serological levels decreased gradually, but more slowly than the skin lesions, and two dogs out of six remained positive in the absence of skin lesions or symptoms. All dogs initially tested positive for dust mites and/or storage mites. The IgE titres remained unchanged 12 months later in the five tested dogs. This case report demonstrates the efficacy of lotilaner on scabies in a cohort of infested dogs under natural conditions and the potential antigenic cross-reaction of S. scabiei with house dust and storage mites.

Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate41%
Submission to final decision87 days
Acceptance to publication62 days
CiteScore0.200
Impact Factor-
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