Canadian Respiratory Journal

Canadian Respiratory Journal / 2015 / Article

Clinico-Pathologic Conferences | Open Access

Volume 22 |Article ID 231043 | 3 pages | https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/231043

Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma: A Case with Unique and Impressive Computed Tomography Findings

Abstract

Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare malignancy. Its etiology, imaging features and optimal treatment are not well understood. Pulmonary pseudoaneurysms and lymphadenopathy are rare complications of synovial sarcomas. A 40-year-old woman with mild hemoptysis and thoracic back pain underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed multiple pulmonary lesions, paraesophageal lymphadenopathy and incidental bilateral pulmonary emboli. A diagnosis of PPSS was made through the identification of an SS18 translocation by fluorescence in situ hybridization. She was started on adriamycin, ifosfamide and mesna chemotherapy. Over the subsequent two months, she developed three pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms, ultimately requiring endovascular coiling. Seven months after starting treatment, the patient was asymptomatic. The lesions and lymphadenopathy decreased in size. The present case highlights complications of a rare malignancy and demonstrates positive response to ifosfamide-based chemotherapy in the setting of PPSS.

Copyright © 2015 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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